Scheme of Studies

1st semester:

Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
HU-101 Functional English 3(3-0)
IS-101 Islamic Studies/ Ethics 1(1-0)
CHE-101 Chemical Process Principles-I 3(3-0)
ME-101 Engineering Drawing 1(0-1)
CC-102 Computer & Computation 2(1-1)
MA-101 Mathematics-I (Calculus & Statistics) 3(3-0)
CH-101 Applied Chemistry-I 4(3-1)
Total 17

 

2nd Semester:

Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
HU-204 Communication Skills 2(2-0)
CHE-204 Particle Technology 4(3-1)
HU-102 Pakistan Studies 1(1-0)
MA-102 Mathematics-II (Differential Equations) 3(3-0)
EE-202 Applied Electrical Engineering 2(2-0)
PHY-101 Physics 4(3-1)
Total 16

 

3rd Semester:

Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
HU-103 Technical Report Writing & Presentation Skills 2(2-0)
CH-202 Applied Chemistry-II 4(3-1)
CHE-201 Chemical Process Principles-II 3(3-0)
CC-202 Computer Programming & Software Application 2(1-1)
CHE-202 Fluid Mechanics-I 3(2-1)
ME-202 Workshop Practices 1(0-1)
ME-203 Engineering Mechanics 2(2-0)
Total 17

 

 

4th Semester:

Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
ME-203 Computer Aided Engineering Drawing 1(0-1)
CHE-206 Fuel & Energy 4(3-1)
CHE-102 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics-I 4(3-1)
CHE-205 Chemical Process Technology-I 4(3-1)
CHE-213 Fluid Mechanics-II 2(2-0)
CHE-203 Engineering Materials 3(3-0)
Total 18

 

5th Semester:

Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
CHE-301 Heat Transfer-I 2(2-0)
CHE-302 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics-II 3(3-0)
MA-304 Numerical Analysis and Computer Application 3(2-1)
MA-203 Chemical Engineering Mathematics 3(3-0)
CHE-303 Chemical Reaction Engineering 3(2-1)
CHE-304 Mass Transfer-I 3(2-1)
Total 17

 

6th Semester:

Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
CHE-310 Mass Transfer-II 2(2-0)
ChE-309 Heat Transfer-II 3(2-1)
CHE-305 Engineering Economics 2(2-0)
CHE-306 Chemical Process Technology-II 2(2-0)
CHE-307 Instrumentation & Process Control 4(3-1)
CHE-311 Chemical Reactor Design 2(2-0)
CHE-308 Chemical Process Design & Simulation 3(2-1)
Total 18

 

7th Semester:

Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
CHE-401 Transport Phenomena 3(3-0)
CHE-402 Simultaneous Heat & Mass Transfer Operations 4(3-1)
CHE-403 Chemical Plant Design 3(3-0)
CHE-404 Chemical Engineering Plant Design Project 3(0-3)
CHE-405 Elective-I (Details given below) 3(3-0)
Total 16

 

 

8th Semester:

Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
CHE-406 Maintenance Engineering & Safety 2(2-0)
CHE-407 Chemical Engineering Plant Design Project 3(0-3)
CHE-408 Elective-II (Details given below) 3(3-0)
CHE-409 Elective-III (Details given below) 3(3-0)
MGT-402 Production & Operations Management 3(3-0)
Total 14

Elective Subjects:

 

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS 

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

To develop understanding of applying governing equations of mass, momentum and energy to simulate chemical engineering processes by the use commercial CFD and numerical codes

Course Outline:

Scope and limitations of experimental, analytical and numerical methods in transport processes. The Continuity Equation and governing equations for Momentum, Heat and Mass transport in a continuum. The General Transport Equation.

Discretization, basic concepts and methods. Discretized forms and solution methodologies for steady and unsteady one-dimensional heat conduction. Extension of discretization concepts to two- and three- dimensional domains. Modeling of Convection and Diffusion terms using various discretization schemes. Calculation of flow field using SIMPLE algorithm.

Case studies: Simulation of various one- and two-dimensional laminar flow situations covered in the course of Transport Phenomena using a CFD software and comparison of results with analytical solutions.

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

  1. S. V., Numerical heat transfer and fluid flow, Hemisphere, 1980.
  2. Versteeg, H. and Malalasekra, W., An Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics: The Finite Volume Method, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 2007.

 

NOVEL SEPARATION PROCESSES

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

 

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

To impart the knowledge about Novel separation processes i.e; membrane processes, adsorption and desorption that had been used in process industries in last few decades in increasing order.

Course Outline:

General theory of multistage separations based upon equilibrium and rate processes. Theory, design and analyses of ion exchange processes along with their industrial applications. Mass transfer processes through membranes: separation of chemical species using osmosis, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis and molecular sieves. Adsorption, desorption and other surface phenomena, design and operation of adsorption columns. Chromatographic separation technology and its application to chemical and biochemical separations.

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

  1. Seader, J. D., and Ernest J. Henley. Separation Process Principles. New York,

NY: Wiley, 1998.

  1. King, C. J. Separation Processes. 2nd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 1980
  1. Manson Benedict, Nuclear Chemical Engineering, 2nd Ed., McGraw-Hill, 1981
  1. Treybal, R. E. Mass Transfer Operations. 3rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 1980.

 

PROCESS ANALYSIS & OPTIMIZATION

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

The knowledge about the various models used for process analysis and optimization in the process industry.

Course Outline:

Use of models in process engineering: Model as a working description of a system. Levels of detail. Types and function of model: mechanistic, empirical, stochastic, procedural and qualitative. Reasoning for using models. Strategy for model building: Relationship between engineering and mathematical approximations. Example of dynamic delay of air heater. Conceptual models. Formulation of functional mechanistic models based on conservation equations.

Coordinate free methods based on vector/matrix notation. Models for complex and irregular geometry. Case study examples for heat exchanger and tubular reactor definition of system parameters consistent with the model. Averaging and modelreduction techniques. Numerical procedures based on weighted residuals.

Adaptive models: Empirical models based on non-linear regressive adaptive refinement of models. State variables models and matrix differential equations. Filtering and continuous up-dating of models. State estimation and adaptive control. Population balance models: Description of process in terms of distribution functions based on principal attributes. Age distribution. Process vessel characteristics in terms or residence time distribution functions. Standard models based on plug flow, CSTR and dead space. Mixing and age distribution. Application to reaction systems and liquid-liquid extraction. Quantitative models:

Diagnostics procedures. Signal flow graphs. Reasoning with qualitative models.

Models for process simulation: Analysis of systems behavior for process optimization, flexibility and safety. Stability and multiple states. Optimization methods; Analytical/numerical techniques for single variable and multi variable

(constraint and unconstrained) functions; linear programming; PERT and CPM project and its organization.

Text and references:

  1. Taha Hamdy A. Operation Research-An Introduction Prentice Hall (Pvt) Limited.
  1. Edgar T.F., Himmelblau D.M. Optimization of Chemical Processes 1989 McGraw-Hill Inc.
  1. V. Babu Process Plant Simulation, 2004 Oxford University Press.
  1. Bruce Nauman, Chemical Reactor Design, Optimization and Scaleup, 2002 McGraw Hill.

Oil & Gas Engineering

 

PETROLEUM REFINERY ENGINEERING

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

To familiarize students with the applications of distillation operations as applied in petroleum refinery. Application of catalysis for increasing and improving quality.

Course Outline:

Introduction; origin; formation and composition of petroleum. Indigenous and world resources. Refinery products; properties; significant tests and standard test methods; characterization and evaluation of crude oil stocks; generation of crude processing data; Crude pre heating and preliminary treatment; pipestill heaters; desalting; atmospheric and vacuum distillation; steam stripping; arrangement of towers. Calculation of number of trays, types of reflux employed; Packies approach; processing plans, schemes and product patterns of refineries. Modern separation, conversion and treatment processes. Thermal & catalytic cracking and reforming, hydrocracking. Auxiliary processes and operations; refinery corrosion and metals; blending plants, product design and marketing. Use of linear programming techniques to solve refinery blending and production problems; overview of petroleum act.

 

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

  1. L. Nelson, Petroleum Refinery Engineering, 1991, MacGraw Hill.
  2. D. Hobson, Modern Petroleum technology, 1991, Applied Sc. Publisher.
  1. H. Cary  and  G.E  Handwork  ,Petroleum Refinery  Technology  &  Economics,

2001 Dekker.

  1. Parkash, Refining Processes Handbook, 2003, Elsevier / GPP.

 

GAS ENGINEERING/PROCESSING

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

To familiarize students with gas separation & techniques for production of natural gas or LPG.

Course Outline:

Introduction to natural gas industry; gas production. testing of well fluid ;Test separator, Multiphase flow meters, establishing GOR; Gas-liquid separation – Design and configurations. Acid gas sweetening ,Chemical and Physical solvent processes. Membrane/molecular sieve processes, Cryogenic separation , solvent regeneration. Dehydration of Natural Gas, LPG recovery and condensate stabilization . Gas processing facilities, process flow schemes and product specifications .

Disposal of gas field emissions, effluent, produced water (EOR, Re-injection, flaring) Design, metallurgy and corrosion protection of gas pipelines and equipments .Slug handling . Gas compression ; compressors types, selection between centrifugal and reciprocating compressor, design considerations. Heat conservation in gas processing facilities. Flare system design ; PSVs, blow down, flare/vent stack sizing. Project design using computer softwares.

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

  1. Ken Arnold, Maurice Stewart , Design of Gas Handling Systems and Facilities, Volume 2 , 1989, Gulf Publishing Company
  2. Stephen A. Newman, Acid and Sour Gas Treating Processes,1985, Gulf Publishing Company
  3. Donald L. Katz , Handbook of Natural Gas Engineering,1990, McGraw Hill
  1. Saeed , Handbook of Natural Gas Transmission and Processing, 2006, Gulf Publishing Company
  2. EJ Hoffman, Membrane Separation Technology, 2003, Gulf Publishing Company

PETROCHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

To develop skills of chemical engineering operations for production of valuable products.

Course Outline:

Recent   trends   in   research   and   development   in   Petrochemical   industries. Hydrocarbon  Sources  and  Raw  materials;  their  characterization,  availability  and pricing. Processes for the production of ethylene, acetylene, and other monomers. Polymerization of monomers into useful palstics.

Synthesis gas production, separation and purification, ammonia synthesis. BTX production, separation and purification.

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

  1. Austin George T. Shreves Chemical Processes Industries 6th Ed. 1997, McGraw Hill International Edition.
  2. Robert A. Meyers, Handbook of Petrochemical Production Processes, 2005, McGraw Hill.
  3. C. Waddems, Chemicals from Petroleum 978, John Murrey.
  1. Strelzoff, Technology and Manufacture of Ammonia, 1982, Inter Science Publishers.
  2. Kirk Othmer , Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, 1999, Intoosc Publishers.

Nuclear Engineering

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

The graduate will have knowledge of basic nuclear reaction mechanism, nuclear cycles and nuclear reactors that will be used peaceful purposes.

Course Outline:

Role and importance of nuclear energy; Nuclear cross- sections; Reaction Rates; Nuclear fission and chain reaction; Criticality conditions; Conversion and breading; Reactor components and their characteristics; Classification and design features of research, production and power reactors; Introduction to fast and fusion reactor systems.

Different types of fuel cycles; Core and feed material preparations; Uranium enrichment; Fabrication of fuel; Reprocessing of Irradiated fuel; Fuel cycle performance of commercially available reactors; In-core fuel management and fuel management strategies.

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

  1. Lamarsh, J. R, Introduction to Nuclear Engineering, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2001.

Journals / Periodicals:

  1. Annals of Nuclear Energy
  2. Nuclear Engineering & Design
  3. Nuclear Technology

NOVEL SEPARATION PROCESSES

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

 

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

To impart the knowledge about Novel separation processes i.e membrane processes, adsorption and desorption that had been used in process industries in last few decades in increasing order.

Course Outline:

General theory of multistage separations based upon equilibrium and rate processes. Theory, design and analyses of ion exchange processes along with their industrial applications. Mass transfer processes through membranes: separation of chemical species using osmosis, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis and molecular sieves. Adsorption, desorption and other surface phenomena, design and operation of adsorption columns. Chromatographic separation technology and its application to chemical and biochemical separations.

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

  1. Seader, J. D., and Ernest J. Henley. Separation Process Principles. New York,

NY: Wiley, 1998.

  1. King, C. J. Separation Processes. 2nd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 1980
  1. Manson Benedict, Nuclear Chemical Engineering, 2nd Ed., McGraw-Hill, 1981
  1. Treybal, R. E. Mass Transfer Operations. 3rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 1980.

Process Engineering

 

POLYMER ENGINEERING 

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

To enhance the knowledge in the field of polymers, their raw material, uses and method of polymerization.

Course Outline:

Detailed account of raw materials used; advanced treatment of methods of polymerization and co-polymerization; principles of polymers formation; thermal cleavage of covalent bonds; radical production by photochemical; high energy radiation and oxidation reduction processes; flow properties of polymers, classification of melt flow behavior, rheological properties, structure and properties of polymer; analysis and testing of polymers; production and properties of commercially important polymers; detailed account of polymer processing; design of equipment and machinery used; recent advances in polymer technology.

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

  1. Fried Joel R. Polymer Science and Technology, 2000, Prentice Hall.
  2. M. Ward & D.W. Hadley, Wiley, An Introduction to the Mechanical Properties of Solid Polymer, 3rd Ed. 1998
  1. Stanley Middlean, Fundmentals of Polymer Engineering, 3rd Ed. 1996.
  2. Tim   Ossworld,  Georg  Menges,  Hanser  Material  Science  of  Polymer  for

Engineering 2003.

CHEMICAL WET PROCESSING

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

The objective of the course is to import knowledge about chemistry, processes inmachines used for designing, bleaching and printing in textile industry.

Course Outline:

Chemistry, processes and machines for desizing, scouring, bleaching and mercerization. Pretreatments. Application of reactive vat and another classes of dyestuff on various machines. Dying of cotton, viscous rayon and blend fibres. Printing, exposing print paste, pigment and reactive types. thickening.

Rotary printing machine on curing process. Objective and service performance of chemical finishing of soft and hard finishing agents. Printing flexibility using CAD / CAM system, Treatment of effluent from Textile Industry, Recovery of chemicals.

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

  1. L. Vigo,Textile Processing and properties, 1994 Elsevier.
  2. Kawabek, Objective Parameters of fabric, 1999, Textile Machinery Society Kyoto.
  1. R. Trotman, Hodder & Stoughton, Dyeing & Chemical Technology of Textile Fibres, 1993 Charles Griffin & Co.
  2. J. Hall, The Standard Handbook of Textiles, 2004, Woodhead Publishing Co.

PROCESS ANALYSIS & OPTIMIZATION

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

The knowledge about the various models used for process analysis and optimization in the process industry.

Course Outline:

Use of models in process engineering: Model as a working description of a system. Levels of detail. Types and function of model: mechanistic, empirical, stochastic, procedural and qualitative. Reasoning for using models. Strategy for model building: Relationship between engineering and mathematical approximations. Example of dynamic delay of air heater. Conceptual models. Formulation of functional mechanistic models based on conservation equations.

Coordinate free methods based on vector/matrix notation. Models for complex and irregular geometry. Case study examples for heat exchanger and tubular reactor definition of system parameters consistent with the model. Averaging and modelreduction techniques. Numerical procedures based on weighted residuals.

Adaptive models: Empirical models based on non-linear regressive adaptive refinement of models. State variables models and matrix differential equations. Filtering and continuous up-dating of models. State estimation and adaptive control. Population balance models: Description of process in terms of distribution functions based on principal attributes. Age distribution. Process vessel characteristics in terms or residence time distribution functions. Standard models based on plug flow, CSTR and dead space. Mixing and age distribution. Application to reaction systems and liquid-liquid extraction. Quantitative models:

Diagnostics procedures. Signal flow graphs. Reasoning with qualitative models.

Models for process simulation: Analysis of systems behavior for process optimization, flexibility and safety. Stability and multiple states. Optimization methods; Analytical/numerical techniques for single variable and multi variable

(constraint and unconstrained) functions; linear programming; PERT and CPM project and its organization.

Text and references:

  1. Taha Hamdy A. Operation Research-An Introduction Prentice Hall (Pvt) Limited.
  1. Edgar T.F., Himmelblau D.M. Optimization of Chemical Processes 1989 McGraw-Hill Inc.
  1. V. Babu Process Plant Simulation, 2004 Oxford University Press.
  2. Bruce Nauman, Chemical Reactor Design, Optimization and Scaleup, 2002 McGraw Hill.

 

Design Engineering

 

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS 

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

To develop understanding of applying governing equations of mass, momentum and energy to simulate chemical engineering processes by the use commercial CFD and numerical codes

Course Outline:

Scope and limitations of experimental, analytical and numerical methods in transport processes. The Continuity Equation and governing equations for Momentum, Heat and Mass transport in a continuum. The General Transport Equation.

Discretization, basic concepts and methods. Discretized forms and solution methodologies for steady and unsteady one-dimensional heat conduction. Extension of discretization concepts to two- and three- dimensional domains. Modeling of Convection and Diffusion terms using various discretization schemes. Calculation of flow field using SIMPLE algorithm.

Case studies: Simulation of various one- and two-dimensional laminar flow situations covered in the course of Transport Phenomena using a CFD software and comparison of results with analytical solutions.

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

  1. S. V., Numerical heat transfer and fluid flow, Hemisphere, 1980.
  2. Versteeg, H. and Malalasekra, W., An Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics: The Finite Volume Method, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 2007.

CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN & SIMULATION

Credit hours: 3(3-0) Prerequisites: Nil

 

Specific objectives of the course:

To develop understanding of various simulations and programming tools for process design.

Course Outline:

Optimization  method.  Heat  and  power  integration.  Reactor  network  design. Separation   system  selection   and   design.   Design   &   Simulation   Software: Introduction to various design and simulation software e.g. HYSYS, ChemCAD etc.  (A  particular  software  may  be  selected  to  cover  the  rest  of  the  course contents)  A  review  of  capabilities  and  limitations  of  the  design  /  simulation software. Flowsheets and sub-flowsheets. Defining process streams and use of Fluid Packages.  Adding common unit operations in the flowsheet. Drawing simple Process  Flow Diagrams  (PFD)  in  HYSYS,  steady  state  material  and  energy balances using graphical user interface and worksheet. Adding instrumentation and control components.  Simple transient calculations.

 

Lab Outline:

Material and energy balance, Flow sheeting on HYSIS, Chem Cad and Matlab

Text and references:

  1. HYSYS (or ChemCAD) User and Tutorial Guide
  2. Davis, Timothy A. and Sigmon, Kermit, “MATLAB Primer, 7th Ed.” Chapman & Hall/CRC, 2004.
  3. 3. Chau, Pao “Process Control: A First Course with MATLAB”, Cambridge

University Press, 2002.

Environmental Engineering

 

RISK MANAGEMENT & SAFETY 

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

The course prepares the students to deal with the risks involved by identifying various hazards in chemical industry and ways and means to deal with them.

Course Outline:

Major hazard accidents, Basic concepts of risk, Hazard identification procedures and techniques, What-if, HAZOP, FMEA. Consequence analysis concerning release of chemical hazards including discharge models, dispersion and effect models

Fire and explosion models, effect models, Estimation of incident frequencies (estimation of incident frequencies from historical data, frequency modeling techniques, FTA and ETA).

Human factors in risk analysis , Risk of chemical reactions e. g. chemical reactivity and run away, Inherent safety in the design of equipment and systems Emergency planning and responses, Storage and transportation of hazardous materials

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

Fullwood R. R., Pobabilitistic Safety assessment in Chemical and Nuclear Industries”. 1999.

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

 

Specific objectives of the course:

The graduate will have knowledge in the area of environmental engineering that includes types of pollution, sampling, monitoring, pollution control considering the international and national standards.

Course Outline:

Environmental Monitoring (Air, Water & Soil) : Objectives of sampling and monitoring programme. Design and types of samples; pre-sampling requirements/information, sampling and design purposes,

Pollution Concept, Types of Pollution, air pollution control technologies, water pollution control technologies, water treatment technologies, soil pollution control technologies, noise pollution control technologies, Biotechnology for environment, industrial pollution control, Occupational safety devices.

Principles and purposes of IEE and EIA and its significance for the society. Cost and benefits of EIA. Main stages in EIA process. Public consultation and participation in EIA process. EIA methods and techniques for impact prediction and evaluation.

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

Cheremisinoff, Handbooks of air pollution prevention and control, 2002

WASTE MANAGEMENT 

Credit hours: 3(3-0)

Prerequisites:

Specific objectives of the course:

The objective of the course is to impart the knowledge of waste generated, its treatment and disposal in light of international/national standards, policies and regulations.

Course Outline:

Environmental Management ISO 14001, EMAS, Environmental auditing, Responsible Care, Environmental Policies & regulations. Different types of ecolabelling

Material Recycling

  1. Recycling of metals
  2. Recycling of polymeric materials

Treatment of liquid waste streams: mechanical, biological and chemical methods. Production of bio-gas. Anaerobic digestion and other stabilization methods. Dewatering. Drying.

Treatment of solid waste: separation, incineration, composting.

  1. Separation
  2. Incineration
  1. Other methods for disposal of solid waste (e.g. composting and landfilling)
  1. Treatment and use of ash-products.

Treatment of radioactive waste.

Lab Outline: N/A

Text and references:

Cheremisinoff, Handbooks of water and waste water treatment technologies, 2002.

 

Total Credit Hour = 133

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